Interior tricks and trends: From home to hospitality and everything in between

- Posted by workex in Uncategorized

The past year has forced us all to think about the space around us. A study by OnePoll for Yale found that 58% of us have developed a new-found fondness for our own four walls and 63% have redecorated a room or their garden during lockdown. Account executive Izzy Shipley explores the top interior trends for summer 2021, from home décor to interior architecture.  

It’s no surprise that the hurricane that was 2020 turned life on its head, and that includes our relationship with the space around us. Interior design is more important than ever, from ‘work from home’ warriors revamping their home office, to restaurants having to completely rethink their interiors as we return to something resembling normal for hospitality.  

To put it simply, we are more aware of our surroundings, and recognise the importance of creating a harmonious space. A comfortable environment boosts your mood, productivity, and energy levels, which will, in turn, improve physical health. From a commercial perspective, this means that your customers will stay longer, spend more, and leave happier if they feel comfortable in their surroundings. We’re expecting to see a few major trends emerge over the next few months as the days get warmer and the nights, longer.  

Green is Queen  

Google has seen a recent spike in the search term ‘houseplant delivery’. Having spent an average of 90% of our time indoors last year1, we’re trying to bring the outside in and make up for lost time in nature.  

Improving air quality, boosting mood, and offering a small sense of responsibility, plants are the new flowers for many. Their classic simplicity and stunning shades of green bring an elegance to any space. With shades of green cropping up as Pantone’s colour of the year three times over the last decade, its clear that the green moment isn’t going to subside any time soon.  

As well as the ever-trendy cheese plant, we’re expecting lots of palms and bamboo plants flying off the shelves as the weather warms up. 

As we finally begin to leave our homes and head out into the wilderness that is bars and restaurants, we can anticipate that some venues will attempt to recreate that at-home cosiness we’re all used to.  

Cottagecore is an interior aesthetic inspired by a romanticised interpretation of agricultural life. Expect to see gingham prints and vintage florals paired with traditional materials like oak, timber and brass to create a muted palette.  

The devil is in the detail with this trend. It’s as much about vintage glassware and rustic fittings as it is about traditional patterns. We wouldn’t be surprised if this is also reflected in a return to ‘farm-to-fork’ cuisine to reflect the bucolic aesthetic.  

The events of the past year have seen us all introspectfocusing on the small businesses around us and the people behind them. Coupled with an ever-growing trend to support independent and often minority-owned businesses, we may begin to see many more homes and hospitality venues adorned by the work of local artists.  

From graffiti canvases created by up-and-coming artists of colour to sculptures crafted by female-owned potteries, mass-produced art might become a thing of the past.  

The desire for place-identity is also gaining popularity among interior designers, with palettes, materials, and details designed to reflect the local surroundings. After a year at home, consumers feel increasingly connected to their geographics and reflecting this in interior design creates a strong sense of identity, both at-home and in commercial venues.  

Of course, trends are hard to predict, and we’re always excited to see outofthebox ideas within the industry. The key to any successful interior design is creativity, and an astute understanding of what you’re trying to evoke. Whether you’ll be at the garden centre stocking up on plants, or a vintage market picking up soft florals for your cottage-core kitchen, create a space you love and you’ll be onto a winner.  

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